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SATURN RETURNS (2009) —

Divine Comedy / Dante Alighieri

November 17th, 2008 — 10:45 am

First 18 Lines from Inferno (Canto I):

Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita
mi ritrovai per una selva oscura,
ché la diritta via era smarrita.

Ahi quanto a dir qual era è cosa dura
esta selva selvaggia e aspra e forte
che nel pensier rinova la paura!

Tant’ è amara che poco è più morte;
ma per trattar del ben ch’i’ vi trovai,
dirò de l’altre cose ch’i’ v’ho scorte.

Io non so ben ridir com’ i’ v’intrai,
tant’ era pien di sonno a quel punto
che la verace via abbandonai.

Ma poi ch’i’ fui al piè d’un colle giunto,
là dove terminava quella valle
che m’avea di paura il cor compunto,

guardai in alto e vidi le sue spalle
vestite già de’ raggi del pianeta
che mena dritto altrui per ogne calle.

English:

MIDWAY upon the journey of our life
I found myself within a forest dark,
For the straightforward pathway had been lost.

Ah me! how hard a thing it is to say
What was this forest savage, rough, and stern,
Which in the very thought renews the fear.

So bitter is it, death is little more;
But of the good to treat, which there I found,
Speak will I of the other things I saw there.

I cannot well repeat how there I entered,
So full was I of slumber at the moment
In which I had abandoned the true way.

But after I had reached a mountain’s foot,
At that point where the valley terminated,
Which had with consternation pierced my heart,

Upward I looked, and I beheld its shoulders
Vested already with that planet’s rays
Which leadeth others right by every road.

(Translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow)

Comment » | References to Quotes

“My Life To Live”

November 17th, 2008 — 10:23 am

Moi, je crois qu’on est toujours responsable de ce qu’on fait… Et libre…
Je lève la main, je suis responsable. Je tourne la tête à droite, je suis responsable. Je malheureuse, je suis responsable. Je fume une cigarette, je suis responsable. Je ferme les yeux, je suis responsable.
J’oublie que je suis responsable, mais je le suis… Après tout, tout est beau…
Après tout, les choses sont comme elles sont… Et la vie, c’est la vie.

(Jean-Luc Godard - Vivre sa vie, 1962)

Comment » | References to Quotes

1. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

November 17th, 2008 — 10:07 am

T.S. Eliot (1888–1965). Prufrock and Other Observations.  1917.

S’io credesse che mia risposta fosse
A persona che mai tornasse al mondo,
Questa fiamma staria senza piu scosse.
Ma perciocche giammai di questo fondo
Non torno vivo alcun, s’i’odo il vero,
Senza tema d’infamia ti rispondo.

LET us go then, you and I,
When the evening is spread out against the sky
Like a patient etherised upon a table;
Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets,
The muttering retreats 5
Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels
And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells:
Streets that follow like a tedious argument
Of insidious intent
To lead you to an overwhelming question … 10
Oh, do not ask, “What is it?”
Let us go and make our visit.
In the room the women come and go
Talking of Michelangelo.
The yellow fog that rubs its back upon the window-panes, 15
The yellow smoke that rubs its muzzle on the window-panes
Licked its tongue into the corners of the evening,
Lingered upon the pools that stand in drains,
Let fall upon its back the soot that falls from chimneys,
Slipped by the terrace, made a sudden leap, 20
And seeing that it was a soft October night,
Curled once about the house, and fell asleep.
And indeed there will be time
For the yellow smoke that slides along the street,
Rubbing its back upon the window-panes; 25
There will be time, there will be time
To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet;
There will be time to murder and create,
And time for all the works and days of hands
That lift and drop a question on your plate; 30
Time for you and time for me,
And time yet for a hundred indecisions,
And for a hundred visions and revisions,
Before the taking of a toast and tea.
In the room the women come and go 35
Talking of Michelangelo.
And indeed there will be time
To wonder, “Do I dare?” and, “Do I dare?”
Time to turn back and descend the stair,
With a bald spot in the middle of my hair— 40
[They will say: “How his hair is growing thin!”]
My morning coat, my collar mounting firmly to the chin,
My necktie rich and modest, but asserted by a simple pin—
[They will say: “But how his arms and legs are thin!”]
Do I dare 45
Disturb the universe?
In a minute there is time
For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.
For I have known them all already, known them all:—
Have known the evenings, mornings, afternoons, 50
I have measured out my life with coffee spoons;
I know the voices dying with a dying fall
Beneath the music from a farther room.
So how should I presume?
And I have known the eyes already, known them all— 55
The eyes that fix you in a formulated phrase,
And when I am formulated, sprawling on a pin,
When I am pinned and wriggling on the wall,
Then how should I begin
To spit out all the butt-ends of my days and ways? 60
And how should I presume?
And I have known the arms already, known them all—
Arms that are braceleted and white and bare
[But in the lamplight, downed with light brown hair!]
It is perfume from a dress 65
That makes me so digress?
Arms that lie along a table, or wrap about a shawl.
And should I then presume?
And how should I begin?
.      .      .      .      .
Shall I say, I have gone at dusk through narrow streets 70
And watched the smoke that rises from the pipes
Of lonely men in shirt-sleeves, leaning out of windows?…
I should have been a pair of ragged claws
Scuttling across the floors of silent seas.
.      .      .      .      .
And the afternoon, the evening, sleeps so peacefully! 75
Smoothed by long fingers,
Asleep … tired … or it malingers,
Stretched on the floor, here beside you and me.
Should I, after tea and cakes and ices,
Have the strength to force the moment to its crisis? 80
But though I have wept and fasted, wept and prayed,
Though I have seen my head [grown slightly bald] brought in upon a platter,
I am no prophet—and here’s no great matter;
I have seen the moment of my greatness flicker,
And I have seen the eternal Footman hold my coat, and snicker, 85
And in short, I was afraid.
And would it have been worth it, after all,
After the cups, the marmalade, the tea,
Among the porcelain, among some talk of you and me,
Would it have been worth while, 90
To have bitten off the matter with a smile,
To have squeezed the universe into a ball
To roll it toward some overwhelming question,
To say: “I am Lazarus, come from the dead,
Come back to tell you all, I shall tell you all”— 95
If one, settling a pillow by her head,
Should say: “That is not what I meant at all.
That is not it, at all.”
And would it have been worth it, after all,
Would it have been worth while, 100
After the sunsets and the dooryards and the sprinkled streets,
After the novels, after the teacups, after the skirts that trail along the floor—
And this, and so much more?—
It is impossible to say just what I mean!
But as if a magic lantern threw the nerves in patterns on a screen: 105
Would it have been worth while
If one, settling a pillow or throwing off a shawl,
And turning toward the window, should say:
“That is not it at all,
That is not what I meant, at all.”
.      .      .      .      .
110
No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be;
Am an attendant lord, one that will do
To swell a progress, start a scene or two,
Advise the prince; no doubt, an easy tool,
Deferential, glad to be of use, 115
Politic, cautious, and meticulous;
Full of high sentence, but a bit obtuse;
At times, indeed, almost ridiculous—
Almost, at times, the Fool.
I grow old … I grow old … 120
I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled.
Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare to eat a peach?
I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach.
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each.
I do not think that they will sing to me. 125
I have seen them riding seaward on the waves
Combing the white hair of the waves blown back
When the wind blows the water white and black.
We have lingered in the chambers of the sea
By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown 130
Till human voices wake us, and we drown.

Comment » | References to Quotes

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November 16th, 2008 — 03:26 am

(MORE TO COME)

Comment » | Uncategorized

Full Cast & Crew

November 16th, 2008 — 03:21 am

WRITTEN BY IMRI KAHN AND LIOR SHAMRIZ
DIRECTED, FILMED AND EDITED BY LIOR SHAMRIZ

CAST
TAL MEIRI
JOSHUA BOGLE
CHLOE GRIFFIN

JULIEN BINET
MARTIN DECKERT
HEINZ EMIGHOLZ
JOSHEPH SHAMRIZ
RENE SCHOENENBERGER
IMRI KAHN

NAMOSH ARSLAN
LUCINDA DAYHEW
JUERGEN BOGLE
URI EILAM
SHARA ELIZABETH ROSELYN IRINA FRIPP SHAMAIM VASYLENKO
ROI KOVALIO
ALESSIO BONACCORSI
CIGDEM KAGITCIBASI
OLIVER BROUMIS
ZAHER ALI
SEBASTIAN BODIRSKY
MOTI BRECHER
AYELET ALBENDA
LIOR  SHAMRIZ

97 MINUTES, GERMANY ISRAEL 2009
1:2.35

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: IMRI KAHN
SET DESIGN BY CHLOE GRIFFIN AND MARTIN DECKERT

EXECUTED BY LIOR SHAMRIZ, IMRI KAHN, CHLOE GRIFFIN

SOUND DESIGN BY ASSAF GIDRON, JOCHEN JEZUSSEK

SUPPORTED BY AICF, ASTA, GAIUS MAECENAS

ANYSIS FILMS
JEHUTI MOTION PICTURES
MYTHS PRODUCTIONS
THE INSTITUTE FOR TIME, BERLIN

2009

Comment » | Full Credits

Production Company / Contact Information

November 5th, 2008 — 12:14 pm

Anysis Films
Jehuti Films

www.jehuti.com
anysis.jehuti.com

Contact Information:
contact@jehuti.com

Mail can be sent to the following address:
Shamriz, Jehuti Films, Kottbusser Damm 67, 10967 Berlin, Germany

Comment » | Full Credits

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